Category Archives: Fashion

Shop for Apparel In Good and Complete Shop

Dress Barn clothing stores are retail outlets which specialize in women’s clothing and apart from a prominent physical presence these stores enjoy business through the net as well through their online website. In the fashion-conscious and appearance-conscious world of today, everyone wants to present themselves in the best possible manner and since clothes form an important part of one’s overall look, it becomes imperative to select the right kind of clothes. It has been remarked many-a-times that clothes make or break a person and hence a visit to the clothing store is a must every once in a while for an individual who sets a lot of store by his clothes.

The Dress Barn Clothing Stores are not only one of the best options for women but are also well known all over the world for women’s footwear as well as accessories. These stores not only produce and sell fashion products for women, but they also offer a wide variety of apparel wherein one can select from a wide range of dresses, sweaters, skirts, pants, jackets and a variety of other accessories. Apart from featuring the latest trends and fashions at reasonable prices, one is likely to come across business wear, formal wear, casuals, accessories, handbags as well as shoes which can go through with help from one of the friendly and knowledgeable shop assistants.

Apart from the 800 retail outlets dotted all across the country, the Dress Barn clothing stores have an online website as well in which one would come across detailed catalogs of their clothing and accessories, information about the company, the various locations of their stores, the prices of their products, the latest trends and discounts and also about discounts and other schemes. Since this organization has been specialized in women’s clothing for more than 40 years, the experience is evident in the range of sizes which are offered as well as the expertise of the well trained staff which assist the customers to find the right apparel for themselves.

Planning To Start A Store Business Store

Opening a fashion retail outlet is not as easy as it sounds. Just like any other business venture, opening a clothing store can indeed be tricky. This is the reason why you need to have a clothing store business plan. Your business plan will serve as your guide as you go through the twists and turns of starting your own fashion and clothing store. Here are some factors that you must consider and include in your plan.

How much capital are you putting in? This is a very important aspect of the business plan. This will help determine how big and how extensive the business will be. This will also help determine how much merchandise you will be able to initially invest in. The capital stated in your clothing store business plan will also help determine several other important aspects of your store such as the location and the number of employees. A good location choice is important in ensuring the success of your business. Make sure that you are in a location where your market can easily access your products. At the same time, knowing how many people to employ will help you make a good projection for your costs. Know how much of the work you can do yourself in order to save costs.

Another important aspect to consider in your clothing store business plan is your target market. If you have yet to establish a name in the clothing and fashion retail industry, it is important that you first make your mark by focusing on a specific market. Are you selling clothes for women or men? Do you want to focus on kids’ clothing or perhaps you would be interested in selling clothes for babies and infants? Focus on a target market and be an expert on what they need as well as on the latest trends.

When making your clothing store business plan, it is also important to clearly envision how your business will run in next six to twelve months. This way you will be able to make a through list of your projected income and your projected expenses. List down the possible problems that you may encounter and how these problems can be resolved. There is nothing like being prepared for the worst.

Rei Kawakubo Ties Business Like Its Design

When the Internet company I was working for in the mid-’90s switched me from World Cup soccer coverage to fashion, I found there were two things about my new beat that flummoxed me: the zealous reverence for Italian Vogue and the repeated mention of someone named Ray.

“Ray who?” I was dying to ask. His name sans surname was always coming up at the fashion events I attended. It was not until some time later that I figured out “Ray” was Rei Kawakubo. And by the time the Rei Kawakubo/Comme des Garçons: Art of the In-Between exhibition at The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York finishes in early September, the greater public will also be on a first-name basis with the 74-year-old Japanese designer.

In talking about Kawakubo’s Comme des Garçons, one inevitably mentions certain landmark events in its history: its atomic-chic Destroy collection in Paris in 1982; its bulbous lumps-and-bumps Spring 1997 collection; the triple-sleeved shirts; the perfume that smells like photocopier fluid; the braces ad; the chromatic progression from fetishized black to red to gold.

Less known are certain fillips of information that have slipped through the media sieve in amusingly terse interviews meted out to journalists over the years. Like the fact that Kawakubo’s mother was an English teacher and a divorcee—the latter a rare and renegade thing to be in postwar Japan. Some attribute Kawakubo’s sustained rebellion against fashion norms to the original matriarchal revolt. She hasn’t commented on that—at least publicly—but her quotes in the show notes from the exhibit provide some insight into her unorthodox point of view: In 2011, she said, “I never give myself any boundaries or let them interfere with my work.” In 2012, Kawakubo made her manifesto clear: “Personally, I don’t care about function at all…. When I hear ‘Where could you wear that?’ or ‘It’s not very wearable’ or ‘Who would wear that?’ to me it’s just a sign that someone missed the point.”

And what is that point? It’s not about making clothes for Kawakubo; it’s about creating objects for the body that have a conceptual and transgressive connection to the human silhouette. Or, as she said in 2015: “Things that have never been seen before have a tendency to be somewhat abstract, but making art is not my intention at all. All my effort is oriented toward giving form to clothes that have never been seen before.”

On display at the museum are all the highlights of Kawakubo’s profoundly punk career, if we take “punk” in the larger sense of uncivil disobedience. There is the Comme des Garçons “lace”­—the falling-apart knits of the early ’80s. There are the signature asymmetry, wigs and frayed hems and the outsized ruffles, bows and tulles. What will be more difficult to exhibit is design of a less tangible kind—which is to say, the Comme des Garçons way of doing business.

Kawakubo has said that she “‘design[s]’ the company, not just clothes.” The privately held company generates somewhere in the ballpark of $220 million a year in revenue. It does so with business ideas that are as avant-garde as the clothing.

Unlike other typically hierarchical corporations, Comme des Garçons has a horizontal strategy that carpet bombs the market with diffusion lines, spinoff brands, collaborations and unusual retail concepts. Besides the main women’s and men’s collections, there are currently 18 different product lines, ranging from Play, Tricot and Shirt to Wallets, Girl and Homme Plus. Then there are the numerous collaborations, which Comme des Garçons began doing before other brands. There were the prescient retail projects, like the guerrilla pop-up marts, which it stopped in 2011 when everyone else caught on. There are also the market-shopping experiences, like Dover Street Market.

But perhaps the most unusual way Kawakubo has designed her company is that it has evolved a stable of designers. Neither a collaboration, nor a collective nor a conglomerate, the umbrella organization of Comme des Garçons and its satellite of designers grow out of a modern-day master-apprentice guild: Junya Watanabe, Tao Kurihara (though she discontinued her line in 2011), Fumito Ganryu (who left the company earlier this year) and Kei Ninomiya.

And then there is Gosha Rubchinskiy. Comme des Garçons owns the Gosha label, but it is unclear whether the Russian designer has the same relationship to the mother ship as his Japanese counterparts. In the case of Watanabe and Ninomiya, each designer is independent yet conversant with Comme des
Garçons vernacular and, as such, benefits from the protection offered by the company’s big tent. The Gosha venture, whose post-Soviet aesthetic is entirely distinct, is an outlier and, possibly, a new kind of business in the Comme des Garçons universe.

Comme des Garçons benefits from the pervasive buzz of all these lateral associations without the full weight, presumably, of having to run them. It operates a little like a franchise that somehow escapes the blanket sameness of, say, Tommy Hilfiger. The Comme des Garçons business model has its rules but retains the playfulness and wiggle room essential to its cool factor. This makes its design every bit as radical as a three-armed shirt, and somehow, despite that, it’s a money-maker.

Here’s How To Unlock Clothing Store At Home!

Opening a clothing store is the dream of many people and it feels so much different to be one’s own boss. However, those who want to open their own store should ask themselves questions like: how to open it? What style should the clothes be? How much money will it need to operate the store? It takes more than a thought to open a clothing store. People should consider the following aspects before opening the store.

First, why do you want to open a clothing store?

Some people are irrational when it comes to starting their own business, others are too rational and could not make the final decision, still others are the combination of the two types of people mentioned earlier, they are what we call romantic idealistic entrepreneurs. People should know why they want to open a clothing store before they actually open one.

Second, what are the odds of succeeding in starting one’s own business?

A research indicates that two out of ten people could succeed in starting their own business. Experts in this field believe that to succeed in opening clothing store, owners should make their business competitive, pay enormous attention to market change and adjust them to the new consumer cultural form in order to survive in the market.

Third, what kind of store to open?

Could you be able to provide an immediate answer when asked about what kind of store you want to open? If you are still confused about this, the following tips might help you make the final decision. You could consider opening a fashion pioneer store and create fashion trend if you are creative, passionate and willing to try new things. You could fill your store with exquisitely designed fashion items and clothes if you have a sharp and elegant taste in fashion. You could open a store selling clothes of average price if you tend to follow your feelings and put other people’s interest first.

Fourth, where should it locate?

The location of the store exerts direct influence on the profitability of the store. Therefore, owners should evaluate the surrounding environment of the store: is the transportation is convenient? Are the surrounding facilitates beneficial to the sales of the clothes? Is the population large in the surrounding area? Is the income of targeted consumers high? Owners are recommended to conduct detailed research about the location of the store before opening it.

Fashion Trend Bontok has managed to reach Fever Pitch

When I was a kid, every time my family went on vacation, my mother would break out her fabulously fake Louis Vuitton fanny pack. We have photo albums filled with her posing in New York, Boston, L.A. and Quebec City, a white tee tucked into faded mom jeans and the fanny pack around her waist. She didn’t care that it was so blatantly fake. It was a gift from her girlfriends (before she moved to Canada from South Korea in 1975), and although she did own an authentic LV Speedy, she was more interested in the hands-free practicality of her “travel bag” than the inauthenticity of a perfectly fine and damn-fly-looking fanny.

Clearly my mom was ahead of her time, because fakes have gone from fashion faux pas to must-have, thanks primarily to the high-end bootlegging ways of Demna Gvasalia at Vetements and Alessandro Michele at Gucci. Gvasalia was the first to turn the fake on its head with his high-end appropriations of brands like Thrasher, Champion and Canada Goose. (Legit collabs with Champion and Canada Goose would follow.) He took his logo-subverting skills to Balenciaga via his cheeky flip on the Bernie Sanders logo for Fall 2017. Michele began toying with luxury Gucci bootlegs last year when he showed “fake” Gucci tees (inspired by the popular ’80s Chinatown knock-offs) for Resort 2017. And this past May, he one-upped himself with a series of blatantly faketastic “Guccy” sweatshirts.

This tongue-in-cheek parodying of counterfeit culture has been directly influenced by the rise of streetwear—because, despite its four-figure price tags and posh clientele, Vetements is a streetwear brand. And if you squint really hard, Gucci is starting to look like one, too. “The boundary between high and low fashion has blurred so much that it has almost disappeared,” says Hannah Watkins, senior editor of prints and graphics for global trend-forecasting agency WGSN. “Street culture has been so influential on the catwalk and vice versa. There is no line anymore.”

Harlem couturier Daniel Day (better known as “Dapper Dan” of Dapper Dan’s Boutique) was one of the first to blur that line. Day became famous in the ’80s for co-opting luxury logos for his over-the-top, hip hop-inspired designs. The idea first came to him in 1983, when a customer in his shop was bragging about his new Louis Vuitton clutch. “I thought to myself, ‘Wow, if he’s so excited about that little pouch, imagine if he had a whole outfit made out of logos?’” Day began custom-making his own all-over-print “Gucci” bombers, “LV” sweaters and “Fendi” track suits for clients like Run DMC, LL Cool J, Bobby Brown and Salt-N-Pepa. “I didn’t do knock-offs…I did knock-ups,” says Day. “The original styles were drab and boring. I created something that was more exciting than what the brands themselves were doing.” In the end, litigation forced Day to shutter his shop in 1992.

Twenty-five years later, fakes have come full circle. In perhaps the most epic “real fake” fashion moment to date, Michele paid homage to a Dapper Dan design, sending a fur bomber jacket with enormous double-G-printed balloon sleeves down the runway for Gucci’s Resort 2018. It was a luxury appropriation of a Dapper Dan appropriation of an original Louis Vuitton logo. “It’s pretty bonkers,” laughs Shannon Schafer, senior fashion director at Nordstrom. “But maybe things need to be a little bonkers right now to break through all the noise and really be disruptive.”

Even Louis Vuitton is getting in on the crazy logo play. Take, for example, its recent bag collaboration with Jeff Koons. The pop artist’s “JK” initials appear in the brand’s insignia.

“The big designers are almost embracing the idea of the bootleg because they’ve realized it’s driving their brands,” says Watkins. “They’re not taking themselves so seriously anymore. But they’re clever—they know it’s a trend right now.”

The trickle-down has been hardcore—Aritzia riffed on Vetements with its own capsule of DHL-esque sweats. And indie brands and millennial artists have also taken up the appropriation call: Ava Nirui is Helmut Lang’s digital editor by day and makes luxury-logo mash-ups by night; Imran Moosvi sells his flashy custom bootlegs to the likes of YG, Lil Yachty and Tyga; and 17-year-old Austin Butts made his own Yeezy tees, which Kanye liked so much that he included them in his own pop-ups. Not long ago, a “cease and desist” would have been the response, but now it’s a different story. “If the big designers were to go after these pop-up people now, I think it would be detrimental to their brands,” says Watkins. “Whether it’s a fake or a real design that’s being spread on social media, it’s increasing their visibility and creating hype, which is what every brand wants.”

The rise of the faux fake has also increased the cachet of the obvious fake. Instagram is flooded with selfies of swag-y millennials showing off their so-bad-they’re-good duds. Even Vogue fashion news writer Liana Satenstein recently posted a photo of a fakes haul (a “Versace” tee and blatantly bad “Chanel” totes) from Tbilisi, Georgia. This trend is more about the ironic attitude than the actual garment—it trumps authenticity and even bad taste.

In the spirit of shameless fakery, I wore my mom’s “vintage” fanny pack (which I dug out of storage a couple of years ago) to an industry party. It’s a little crushed on one side, and the lettering on the “leather” patch has practically worn off, but this only adds to it’s subversive charm. Of course, it was all anyone wanted to talk about. “That is pure perfection,” said a friend. “It’s realer than the real thing.”

Real Cost of Buying Fake Designer Goods

I arrive at what appears to be a vacant storefront near Toronto’s Wychwood neighbourhood. The windows are papered over, and there’s no sign on the door. But the door is unlocked, so I tentatively enter a room lined with large plastic bins crammed with a veritable Willy Wonka’s Chocolate Factory selection of designer goods: fur-lined Gucci mules, crystal-encrusted Christian Louboutins and a rainbow’s worth of Valentino “Rockstud” pumps. A narrow corridor leads to another room with floor-to-ceiling shelves overcrowded with Chanel, Saint Laurent and Céline purses. None of them are the real thing.

To gain access to this secret depot of luxury fakes, you need to be referred by a previous customer. Ava*, a 27-year-old entrepreneur who has been shopping here for the past two years, told me about the place. I’m not the only one here on this rainy Thursday afternoon. A mother urges her daughter to decide which Chanel bag she likes best. Across the room, a woman is trying on shoes with the proprietor of the business, a tanned blonde who appears to be in her early 40s. I recall the conversation I had with Ava about her. “I don’t know her name,” she told me. “We all have her in our phones as ‘Bag Lady.’”

The quality of counterfeit products has always ranged from bags that practically scream “Channel” beneath interlocking Cs to borderline-indistinguishable Hermès fakes that cost $2,000 (instead of $20,000 for the real deal). The goods on offer at the Bag Lady’s store range between $350 and $1,500—a fake Louis Vuitton tote, for example, will run you close to $700. According to Rania Sedhom, a lawyer with the Bespoke Law Firm in New York who counts Moda Operandi and The Luxury Marketing Council among her clients, some counterfeiters today can produce fakes that are good enough to elicit a double take, instead of an eye roll, from discriminating purse hounds. They typically buy the original designer bag first, she says, study it in order to replicate it and then source high-quality materials from the same leather mills that supply the designers. Not only is the leather of some high-end fakes super-creamy but the advent of 3-D printing allows counterfeiters to create an exact prototype of what appears on a real designer bag and mass-produce it. Fakes are also becoming easier to buy. Sedhom claims that a retailer you’ve never heard of might pop up on Instagram or Snapchat with a link to a website claiming to sell authentic merchandise with a convincing backstory.“Once they get a ‘cease and desist’ letter, they’ll shut down, open under a new name and then continue to sell their merchandise,” says Sedhom. She suggests steering clear of sites where you’re buying directly from an individual. Instead, she recommends sites like The RealReal, which authenticates all merchandise before putting it up for sale.

Some luxury brands are smoke bombing counterfeiters by embedding radio-frequency identification (RFID) chips, which are the size of a grain of rice, into their products. The technology uses electromagnetic fields to identify and track the whereabouts of an object. RFID chips are beginning to gain traction in the United States but less so in Europe, where stringent privacy laws forbid tracking people without their knowledge and consent. In theory, customers can use their smartphones to scan the RFID chips and authenticate their purchases. Exactly where the chips are embedded is harder to say—companies often change the placement to make it more difficult for counterfeiters to replicate the products.

For Ashlee Froese, a fashion and branding lawyer at Fogler, Rubinoff LLP in Toronto, buying counterfeit items—whether they’re good fakes or not—isn’t the biggest issue. She wants consumers to be aware of the dark side of the business. Since these bags are illegal, she says, it’s unlikely that the owners of the factories in which they are manufactured pay attention to upholding workers’ and human rights. And it’s even more unlikely that these businesses are coughing up taxes on these illegal goods, which means less money is going toward essential infrastructure like roads, education and health care. According to some press reports, the Canadian counterfeit market is worth $20 billion to $30 billion. The scariest part of buying fakes, adds Froese, is that law enforcement has linked the illegal profits to international terrorist organizations.

When I asked Ava why she and her friends would rather purchase fakes than save up for a real bag, she answered, “I guess it’s because we’re all so impulsive.” Counterfeits are a form of short-term gratification: You get to wear the It item while it’s still cool but don’t have to pay the full price.

The fakes in the Bag Lady’s sketchy shop are convincing—at first glance. But when I take a closer look, there’s something slightly off. The gold and silver designer logos haven’t been stamped hard enough, so they’re almost floating atop the leather. My eye gravitates toward a pair of silver-foil Gucci loafers, but I don’t try them on, let alone make a purchase. The downsides—both human and legal—to purchasing a fake concern me, and so, too, does the hollow feeling of inauthenticity that they elicit. There’s a thrill to wearing a recognizable logo—I get that—but if it’s a fake, taking pleasure from the artifice may come with its own karmic shadow.

Consider the New Stiletto Design Zvelle Your Ultimate Good Luck Charm

In the year since Sophie Grégoire Trudeau wore a pair of Zvelle shoes on her official visit to Washington to meet the Obamas (remember them?), the little line out of Toronto has seen its fortunes grow. Designer Elle AyoubZadeh’s staff has doubled in size, and for the person “who dresses from the feet up,” she has introduced the Noor stiletto. “We were offering shoes that were more suitable for work or going out casually,” says AyoubZadeh. “As we built our customer base, we wanted to offer something more.”

The limited-edition Noor is handcrafted at a family-owned factory in Brazil using combinations of suede and satin. But the most charming aspect is its anklet strap inspired by a bracelet AyoubZadeh received from her parents when she was just 13. Recreating those charms proved to be a challenge because they had to be the right size to be impactful. At first, they were too small. “When you wore them on your feet, it was really hard to appreciate them,” she says. The second time, she went a little bit bigger, but “the third time, they turned out perfect.”

AyoubZadeh likes her pieces to have special meaning, and the five charms—an Egyptian cat, a Hamsa hand, an evil eye, a pyramid and an upside down heart—promise good luck in Middle Eastern culture. Fun note: The upside down heart actually means “five” in the Persian alphabet (AyoubZadeh was born in Iran), and five is also her lucky number. “It’s not just for design’s sake,” she says. “There’s a lot of meaning culturally, socially and globally.”

This is Why We’ll Never Kick Our Double Denim Addiction

In its ceaseless quest for fresh ideas, fashion adores the obscure, the forgotten and the extinct. Which is why the current double-denim trend is so troubling. If “total jeans” is shorthand for “working class” (i.e., not minimalist or maximalist but Marxist!), our sudden enthusiasm for it may mean that the proletariat has gone the way of the dodo.

Not convinced? When Chloé picked French party-girl/stylist Natacha Ramsay-Levi to take over the brand, she put out a picture of herself with lank hair, jeans and a frayed jean shirt. She looked like she’d been operating heavy machinery.

Sure, Tommy Hilfiger and Ralph Lauren dabble in denim-on-denim, but the rest of the fashion world is doubling down on it, too. A.P.C. produced a denim boiler suit. Vetements, Burberry, Yeezy, Off-White, Sacai, Y/Project and Ottolinger all did double dungarees. If next year’s Met Gala looks like a convention of the Third International, it will be because even Christian Dior, that purveyor of the leisure class, has caught the left-wing bug. “Not so long ago, I was wearing an Acne denim shirt, where the colour was light denim and the body was a tiny bit darker, along with vintage jeans, and everyone said, ‘You did denim-on-denim—that’s weird,’” says stylist Sheila Single, who co-founded the magazine honore. Now, it’s the height of chic to dress like a cowboy or a welder.

Designer Nicolas Ghesquière often takes his bows in jeans and a jean jacket. But for the rest of us, the Canadian tuxedo look stuck around only for a nanosecond. It has since shape-shifted from boot-cuts and Western shirts into couturish cuts, treatments and volume. “Denim has come a long way, of course, and it’s not only associated with factory workers anymore,” say Christa Bösch and Cosima Gadient of the Berlin-based brand Ottolinger. “People of all social classes wear denim and in all sorts of situations. We like it because of that. It’s timeless and basic. You can always wear denim.”

Y/Project is a brand that does high-society denim. Its jeans morph into thickly folded cancan frills at the shin. Off-White’s total denim look for Fall 2017 is overlaid with rust-coloured shirred tulle so that it looks dirty from afar and dainty up close. “Designers used denim in a new and clever way by changing it into prêt-à-porter,” says Single. “They used it in jackets and pants as a noble fabric, bringing in frills and zips and changing it to something less casual. Because it’s not classic shapes; it’s more modern. Now, it’s ‘haute couture.’”

Even the ordinary wear and tear on jeans has been riffed on. At Sacai, rips and tears were fancied up with zippers. Bösch and Gadient torched and poured acid on their denim: “It’s our own take on the garment and the fashion we do. It’s like discovering something new.”

Jeans used to be a no-brainer: what you threw on to do the laundry. Now, they send a message. It can be unexpectedly high-brow and refined or an ironic comment on the ordinary working man. With post-Brexit and U.S. election soul-searching, the demise of the latter has been the topic of many a dinner-party conversation—and now, it seems, on the runways, too.

How Can a Guava Become a Staple of Street Style

Hosiery walks a fine sartorial line, leading a double life as clothing in public and lingerie in private. Its allure is in leaving something to the imagination. Nothing plays the erotic game of peekaboo better than a pair of fishnets as they simultaneously reveal and conceal what’s underneath.

Last September, Kim Kardashian posted an Instagram photo of her topless torso with black openwork Wolford tights stretching above the waistband of her half-done button fly. Like so many of her social media endeavours, the post sparked a frenzy, and the fishnets-and-denim combo took off. Worn under distressed mom jeans or glute-grazing cut-offs, the look has become an #OOTD favourite of virtually every style darling, including blogger Chiara Ferragni, model Hailey Baldwin and singer Pia Mia. In April, Kardashian’s sister Khloé commercialized the approach with a new style from her denim line Good American that features holes patched with fishnets. Meanwhile, in June, Austrian luxury hosiery company Wolford reissued the Kaylee style seen in Kardashian’s post due to popular demand.

Fishnets are a garment loaded with innuendoes, thanks to their origin in cabarets like the Moulin Rouge. In the 1970s, early punks literally tore them apart, giving nets a bad-girl reputation that still resonates nearly five decades later. “It was part of the whole punk ethos of bringing in deliberately disgusting and objectionable styles that were scavenged from bad taste or pornography or both,” says Valerie Steele, fashion historian and director and chief curator of The Museum at the Fashion Institute of Technology. “Once that happened, fishnets were really ripe to keep being revived as a somewhat punk, definitely sexy component in fashion. It re-emerges periodically every few years.” She points to the powerful suggestion of violence inherent in a pair of damaged tights. “Have you fought off someone? Or are you just so degenerate that you wear clothes that are falling apart?”

Vanessa Cesario, the 25-year-old behind Toronto style blog The Brunette Salad, channels this rebellious spirit by using fishnets to add an element of surprise to her slick streetwear-heavy ensembles. “They’re a way to amp up outfits that are otherwise safe,” she says. “I think that now, more than ever, women, myself included, like to wear things that could have been seen as taboo.”

André Leon Talley’s Documentary Will Perform at the Toronto International Film Festival

The 2017 Toronto International Film Festival is quickly approaching and we have another must-see film to add to our watch list: André Leon Talley’s documentary.

Called The Gospel According to André, the 94-minute film will make its official premiere at TIFF 2017 on Sept. 8, with Magnolia Pictures planning a spring 2018 North American theatrical release. Directed by Kate Novack, the “funny and poignant portrait” will chronicle the life of the 67-year-old former Vogue editor-at-large, and will include archival footage of André’s illustrious career, starting with his involvement in Andy Warhol’s Factory during the ’70s, according to WWD.

“André has been an unmissable fixture in the front row of fashion for as long as I can remember, but the story of how he got there has never really been told in an intimate way,” Novack explained to WWD.

Of course, plenty of fashion luminaries will be present, including Anna Wintour, Marc Jacobs, Tom Ford, Valentino and Manolo Blahnik. It will also touch on two important women in Talley’s life: his grandmother, Bennie Frances Davis, a maid on Duke’s campus who raised André with a strong sense of discipline and Diana Vreeland, who took him on as an assistant for a 1974 Metropolitan Museum of Art fashion exhibit and helped launch his career.

Talley, himself, describes the flick as his “journey in the chiffon trenches,” and said the firs take of the film was “glorious.”

Talley’s film isn’t the only fashion documentary coming out this September — Manolo Blahnik’s documentary, Manolo: The Boy Who Made Shoes for Lizards, is set to release Sept. 15, while Zac Posen’s documentary, House of Z, will premiere Sept. 6 exclusively on Vogue.com. Dries Van Noten will also have his own documentary called Dries, though no release date has been confirmed yet.