Monthly Archives: July 2017

Shop for Apparel In Good and Complete Shop

Dress Barn clothing stores are retail outlets which specialize in women’s clothing and apart from a prominent physical presence these stores enjoy business through the net as well through their online website. In the fashion-conscious and appearance-conscious world of today, everyone wants to present themselves in the best possible manner and since clothes form an important part of one’s overall look, it becomes imperative to select the right kind of clothes. It has been remarked many-a-times that clothes make or break a person and hence a visit to the clothing store is a must every once in a while for an individual who sets a lot of store by his clothes.

The Dress Barn Clothing Stores are not only one of the best options for women but are also well known all over the world for women’s footwear as well as accessories. These stores not only produce and sell fashion products for women, but they also offer a wide variety of apparel wherein one can select from a wide range of dresses, sweaters, skirts, pants, jackets and a variety of other accessories. Apart from featuring the latest trends and fashions at reasonable prices, one is likely to come across business wear, formal wear, casuals, accessories, handbags as well as shoes which can go through with help from one of the friendly and knowledgeable shop assistants.

Apart from the 800 retail outlets dotted all across the country, the Dress Barn clothing stores have an online website as well in which one would come across detailed catalogs of their clothing and accessories, information about the company, the various locations of their stores, the prices of their products, the latest trends and discounts and also about discounts and other schemes. Since this organization has been specialized in women’s clothing for more than 40 years, the experience is evident in the range of sizes which are offered as well as the expertise of the well trained staff which assist the customers to find the right apparel for themselves.

Planning To Start A Store Business Store

Opening a fashion retail outlet is not as easy as it sounds. Just like any other business venture, opening a clothing store can indeed be tricky. This is the reason why you need to have a clothing store business plan. Your business plan will serve as your guide as you go through the twists and turns of starting your own fashion and clothing store. Here are some factors that you must consider and include in your plan.

How much capital are you putting in? This is a very important aspect of the business plan. This will help determine how big and how extensive the business will be. This will also help determine how much merchandise you will be able to initially invest in. The capital stated in your clothing store business plan will also help determine several other important aspects of your store such as the location and the number of employees. A good location choice is important in ensuring the success of your business. Make sure that you are in a location where your market can easily access your products. At the same time, knowing how many people to employ will help you make a good projection for your costs. Know how much of the work you can do yourself in order to save costs.

Another important aspect to consider in your clothing store business plan is your target market. If you have yet to establish a name in the clothing and fashion retail industry, it is important that you first make your mark by focusing on a specific market. Are you selling clothes for women or men? Do you want to focus on kids’ clothing or perhaps you would be interested in selling clothes for babies and infants? Focus on a target market and be an expert on what they need as well as on the latest trends.

When making your clothing store business plan, it is also important to clearly envision how your business will run in next six to twelve months. This way you will be able to make a through list of your projected income and your projected expenses. List down the possible problems that you may encounter and how these problems can be resolved. There is nothing like being prepared for the worst.

Rei Kawakubo Ties Business Like Its Design

When the Internet company I was working for in the mid-’90s switched me from World Cup soccer coverage to fashion, I found there were two things about my new beat that flummoxed me: the zealous reverence for Italian Vogue and the repeated mention of someone named Ray.

“Ray who?” I was dying to ask. His name sans surname was always coming up at the fashion events I attended. It was not until some time later that I figured out “Ray” was Rei Kawakubo. And by the time the Rei Kawakubo/Comme des Garçons: Art of the In-Between exhibition at The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York finishes in early September, the greater public will also be on a first-name basis with the 74-year-old Japanese designer.

In talking about Kawakubo’s Comme des Garçons, one inevitably mentions certain landmark events in its history: its atomic-chic Destroy collection in Paris in 1982; its bulbous lumps-and-bumps Spring 1997 collection; the triple-sleeved shirts; the perfume that smells like photocopier fluid; the braces ad; the chromatic progression from fetishized black to red to gold.

Less known are certain fillips of information that have slipped through the media sieve in amusingly terse interviews meted out to journalists over the years. Like the fact that Kawakubo’s mother was an English teacher and a divorcee—the latter a rare and renegade thing to be in postwar Japan. Some attribute Kawakubo’s sustained rebellion against fashion norms to the original matriarchal revolt. She hasn’t commented on that—at least publicly—but her quotes in the show notes from the exhibit provide some insight into her unorthodox point of view: In 2011, she said, “I never give myself any boundaries or let them interfere with my work.” In 2012, Kawakubo made her manifesto clear: “Personally, I don’t care about function at all…. When I hear ‘Where could you wear that?’ or ‘It’s not very wearable’ or ‘Who would wear that?’ to me it’s just a sign that someone missed the point.”

And what is that point? It’s not about making clothes for Kawakubo; it’s about creating objects for the body that have a conceptual and transgressive connection to the human silhouette. Or, as she said in 2015: “Things that have never been seen before have a tendency to be somewhat abstract, but making art is not my intention at all. All my effort is oriented toward giving form to clothes that have never been seen before.”

On display at the museum are all the highlights of Kawakubo’s profoundly punk career, if we take “punk” in the larger sense of uncivil disobedience. There is the Comme des Garçons “lace”­—the falling-apart knits of the early ’80s. There are the signature asymmetry, wigs and frayed hems and the outsized ruffles, bows and tulles. What will be more difficult to exhibit is design of a less tangible kind—which is to say, the Comme des Garçons way of doing business.

Kawakubo has said that she “‘design[s]’ the company, not just clothes.” The privately held company generates somewhere in the ballpark of $220 million a year in revenue. It does so with business ideas that are as avant-garde as the clothing.

Unlike other typically hierarchical corporations, Comme des Garçons has a horizontal strategy that carpet bombs the market with diffusion lines, spinoff brands, collaborations and unusual retail concepts. Besides the main women’s and men’s collections, there are currently 18 different product lines, ranging from Play, Tricot and Shirt to Wallets, Girl and Homme Plus. Then there are the numerous collaborations, which Comme des Garçons began doing before other brands. There were the prescient retail projects, like the guerrilla pop-up marts, which it stopped in 2011 when everyone else caught on. There are also the market-shopping experiences, like Dover Street Market.

But perhaps the most unusual way Kawakubo has designed her company is that it has evolved a stable of designers. Neither a collaboration, nor a collective nor a conglomerate, the umbrella organization of Comme des Garçons and its satellite of designers grow out of a modern-day master-apprentice guild: Junya Watanabe, Tao Kurihara (though she discontinued her line in 2011), Fumito Ganryu (who left the company earlier this year) and Kei Ninomiya.

And then there is Gosha Rubchinskiy. Comme des Garçons owns the Gosha label, but it is unclear whether the Russian designer has the same relationship to the mother ship as his Japanese counterparts. In the case of Watanabe and Ninomiya, each designer is independent yet conversant with Comme des
Garçons vernacular and, as such, benefits from the protection offered by the company’s big tent. The Gosha venture, whose post-Soviet aesthetic is entirely distinct, is an outlier and, possibly, a new kind of business in the Comme des Garçons universe.

Comme des Garçons benefits from the pervasive buzz of all these lateral associations without the full weight, presumably, of having to run them. It operates a little like a franchise that somehow escapes the blanket sameness of, say, Tommy Hilfiger. The Comme des Garçons business model has its rules but retains the playfulness and wiggle room essential to its cool factor. This makes its design every bit as radical as a three-armed shirt, and somehow, despite that, it’s a money-maker.

Here’s How To Unlock Clothing Store At Home!

Opening a clothing store is the dream of many people and it feels so much different to be one’s own boss. However, those who want to open their own store should ask themselves questions like: how to open it? What style should the clothes be? How much money will it need to operate the store? It takes more than a thought to open a clothing store. People should consider the following aspects before opening the store.

First, why do you want to open a clothing store?

Some people are irrational when it comes to starting their own business, others are too rational and could not make the final decision, still others are the combination of the two types of people mentioned earlier, they are what we call romantic idealistic entrepreneurs. People should know why they want to open a clothing store before they actually open one.

Second, what are the odds of succeeding in starting one’s own business?

A research indicates that two out of ten people could succeed in starting their own business. Experts in this field believe that to succeed in opening clothing store, owners should make their business competitive, pay enormous attention to market change and adjust them to the new consumer cultural form in order to survive in the market.

Third, what kind of store to open?

Could you be able to provide an immediate answer when asked about what kind of store you want to open? If you are still confused about this, the following tips might help you make the final decision. You could consider opening a fashion pioneer store and create fashion trend if you are creative, passionate and willing to try new things. You could fill your store with exquisitely designed fashion items and clothes if you have a sharp and elegant taste in fashion. You could open a store selling clothes of average price if you tend to follow your feelings and put other people’s interest first.

Fourth, where should it locate?

The location of the store exerts direct influence on the profitability of the store. Therefore, owners should evaluate the surrounding environment of the store: is the transportation is convenient? Are the surrounding facilitates beneficial to the sales of the clothes? Is the population large in the surrounding area? Is the income of targeted consumers high? Owners are recommended to conduct detailed research about the location of the store before opening it.